Jane Austen and the Penguin Fine Art Prints were created from original watercolour paintings.
True or fanciful, the images were inspired by the social expectations of Bath Georgian society and the possibility of Jane Austen’s presence on Twitter.

  • Jane Austen and the PenguinQuick View
    • Jane Austen and the PenguinQuick View
    • Jane Austen and the Penguin

    • In 1801, on leaving Steventon, Hampshire, Jane Austen arrived in Bath somewhat distressed by an increasing sense of displacement. Her continuing anguish marked a struggle to write with the wit and ease experienced before at her family home. A short note has latterly been found between the pages of a book, possibly being read by Miss Austen at the time:…
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  • Lost For Words In Sydney GardensQuick View
    • Lost For Words In Sydney GardensQuick View
    • Lost For Words In Sydney Gardens

    • Lacking a pianoforte to play at her family’s new lodgings and in search of a diversion, Jane Austen would sometimes walk to Sydney Pleasure Gardens situated at the top of Great Pulteney Street in Bath. On one such occasion, seeking tranquillity and breakfast rather than dalliance and flirtation, she was further unsettled by the blaring of a small, noisy orchestra.…
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  • Gay Street PromenadeQuick View
    • Gay Street PromenadeQuick View
    • Gay Street Promenade

    • Number 25 Gay Street turned out to be the final and poorest lodgings of Jane Austen, her sister Cassandra and their mother, following the death of Mr Austen in 1805. Describing herself as a “desperate walker”, Jane had been delighted to find the penguin an agreeable companion as anxious to escape the heat and confinement of their small rooms as…
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  • Just Call Me DarcyQuick View
    • Just Call Me DarcyQuick View
    • Just Call Me Darcy

    • Finding the penguin standing quite alone at the Bath Assembly Rooms Ball and obviously longing to dance, Miss Austen, herself new to Bath society, asked whether he would care to take to the floor. It was noted, by every gossip in the room, her handsome if diminutive partner, followed her every move with grace, feet and wings outstretched. “Just Call…
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  • Oh! Mr Darcy!Quick View
    • Oh! Mr Darcy!Quick View
    • Oh! Mr Darcy!

    • In 1802, Jane Austen first accepted and then immediately refused an unexpected offer of marriage that may have assured her both social and financial security. Somewhat humiliated by the ensuing confusion, she sought refuge in the companiable to and fro of visitors to Bath’s Sydney Pleasure Gardens. “Oh! Mr Darcy!” depicts a daring leap by her small friend into the…
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  • It’s “Twitter” Mr Darcy said Miss AustenQuick View
    • It’s “Twitter” Mr Darcy said Miss AustenQuick View
    • It’s “Twitter” Mr Darcy said Miss Austen

    • In 1803, Jane Austen’s manuscript for “Susan” was sold to the publisher Crosby and Son for £10.00. After waiting six years for a response to her novel, writing under the pseudonym Mrs Ashton Dennis, she sent an understandably furious letter signed with the initials: MAD. “It’s Twitter Mr Darcy said Miss Austen” illustrates Jane Austen and the penguin sitting near…
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